White Trash Uncut

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White Trash Uncut, published in 1977, was rough around the edges, cultishly known, and energetically opposed to popular culture – much like its subjects. Forty years after photographer Christopher Makos glamorized the freaks who came out at night, Glitterati rereleases this classic – at one point, copies of the out-of-print title were selling for $500 each – with 25 new images.

Punk is not an ideology. It's not a religion. It was just a moment," says poet and punk-rock icon Richard Hell, and few documents captured that snotty, incendiary moment as well as Christopher Makos' White Trash.

Unvarnished book depicts the decline and fall of western civilization with the senses-shattering re-release of cult-classic White Trash Uncut.

Seventies New York was the scene of a unique – and gloriously trashy – creative explosion. And one man was there to capture it. James Lachno meets Christopher Makos.

In den 1970er Jahren war Christopher Makos  Forograf in Andy Warhols Factory. In deren Umfeld erlebte er die Geburt des US-Punk mit. Sein Fotoband “White Trash” von 1977 ist ein genial atemloses Zeugnis dieser Epoche.

Der richtungsweisende Bilband “White Trash” von Christoph Makos wird jetzr in einer “Uncut-Version” neu aufgelegt, wir haben einige der spannendsten Bilder aus dem New Yorker Underground der 70er.

¿Qué tienen en común John Waters, Debbie Harry, Patti Smith, un chaperon sin identificar y Man Ray? Todos ellos son basura blanca. Al menos en el concepto de Christopher Makos, un fotógrafo que dio sus primeros pasos en la Factory de Andy Warhol y que publicó en 1977 el libro ‘White Trash’, ahora ampliado y reditado por la editorial Glitterati Incorporated.

Amongst the razor blade piercings and passed out punk groupies at CBGB’s, an iconic photographer emerged with his camera and an intense desire to heavily document that precise moment of both innocence and corruption. His name is Christopher Makos and we are thrilled to interview this prolific photographer during the re-launch of his 1977 cult classic publication: White Trash Uncut (Glitterati Incorporated).

In the 1970s, New York City was a byword for urban decay and the death of the American dream. But this status also led to it becoming the home of punk rock, a music movement that would take over the world – and photographer Christopher Makos was there to document it all, as he tells Anthony Teasdale.

Today, in honor of Waters, we celebrate the provocative, the punks and the progressives who grace the pages of photographer Christopher Makos’s second edition of White Trash Uncut (Glitterati, 2014). The first edition of White Trash, published in 1977, was a paperback “throwaway,” though like Waters’s films, later became a cult classic and now sells for up to $500 on Amazon. The recently released deluxe second edition features 25 new photographs, a hardcover, and essays by Andrew Crispo and Peter Wise.

Today, in honor of Waters, we celebrate the provocative, the punks and the progressives who grace the pages of photographer Christopher Makos’s second edition of White Trash Uncut (Glitterati, 2014). The first edition of White Trash, published in 1977, was a paperback “throwaway,” though like Waters’s films, later became a cult classic and now sells for up to $500 on Amazon. The recently released deluxe second edition features 25 new photographs, a hardcover, and essays by Andrew Crispo and Peter Wise.

If Punk scene was a religion, then photographer Christopher Makos would be its Evangelist. We have the extreme luck to host a beautiful interview by Christopher Makos, talking about the dark charm of Punk era, people living on the edge and about the challenges of a big photographic career.

In quegli anni, in quella città, ènata una nuova scena musicale. Un giornalista di “rs” e un grande fotografo c’erano e raccontano in due libri in uscita il “chi” e il “cosa”.

Era il 1977 quando, grazie alla pubblicazione di “White Trash”, Christopher Makos diventa il fotografo pionere che riesce a catturare nei suoi scatti la scena punk più emergente. Era un volume crudo e schietto sulla New York più underground nel quale vengono pubblicati alcuni dei ritratti che hanno fatto la storia della fotografia: Andy Warhol, David Bowie, ma anche Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, Alice Cooper, Divina e tanti altri. Ora a circa 40 anni di distanza, Christopher Makos ha deciso di presentare una nuova versione, ri-editata e completamente uncut, pubblicata da Glitterati Incorporated.

Germany’s Lodown Magazine celebrates their 90th issue by making it a photography special featuring over 20 amazing photographers! Christopher Makos, author of White Trash Uncut, is one the greats included with his own beautiful three-page spread.

Christopher Makos creates classics. That’s the easiest way to put it. The photographer’s works have been found in prestigious museums, displayed in the most sought-after private collections (think Gianni Versace and Malcolm Forbes) and in the pages of books that always stay at the very top of coffee tables piles.

Glitterati Incorporated releases White Trash Uncut, Christopher Makos’ cult classic redux from 1977 as a Deluxe Edition. This raw, beautiful book chronicled the downtown NYC punk scene, interspersed with portraits of Uptown Boldface names like the designer Halston and Andy Warhol…

With the publication of his seminal 1977 book, White Trash, Christopher Makos burst on to the photography scene and made a name for himself as the first photographer to record the convergence of the “uptown” and “downtown” worlds, as Debbie Harry fondly remembers. This raw, beautiful volume chronicled the punk scene as it came of age on the street of New York.