Thank You Andy Warhol

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All of these works that attempt to discover the Pope of Pop lack a certain air of intimacy the average reader expects from such personal writing. But, judging from Warhol’s life and work, we should’ve never expected that from him, nor should we expect independent researchers so removed from the subject to truly crack the shell. No, if you really want to know all about Andy, all you have to do is look inside of him through the eyes of those who surrounded him.
 
Andy Warhol never left New York. He is the subject of two outstanding exhibitions—one at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and another at the Benrimon Gallery. “Thank You Andy Warhol” is the tribute exhibit at the Benrimon Contemporary museum in New York. Catherine Johnson, author of a new book about Warhol was on hand to sign books. Johnson’s book, also entitled “Thank You Andy Warhol,” does a wonderful job of illustrating the importance of Andy Warhol to all areas of contemporary American art.
 
The Gershwin was always art-heavy, and this closing night will reflect its glorious past and the souls, living and dead, that gave it its edge. The party will be hosted by Robert Heide, John Gilman, Neke Carson, and Michael Weiner. It will honor the “REGARDING WARHOL” exhibit at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which is running until New Year’s Eve, and a new book named Thank You Andy Warhol by Catherine Johnson and Andy Warhol's New York City by Thomas Kiedrowski. DJ Tennessee will spin Lou Reed, Nico, and all sorts of Warhol-appropriate fare.
 
Andy Warhol has had a massive influence on many people, artists and art enthusiasts alike. Many of his works are now recognized as iconic pieces of pop art, including self-portraits of the artist himself. Thank You Andy Warhol is a new book by Catherine Johnson, containing interviews with artists and friends who thank Andy for his impact in their lives.
 
Andy Warhol is one of the most accessible artists of the twentieth century. So, why another Warhol book? He died 25 years ago and created and exhibited his thirty two Campbell’s soup cans fifty years ago. And we are still talking about his life, his work, and his wig. The eighty interviews in this book with illustrious artists, designers, and others, each of whom was influenced by Andy Warhol just begin to explain why.
 
The massive “Regarding Warhol” retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art has unleashed a wave of renewed interest in the artist’s legacy alongside the usual, now hackneyed, criticisms about the worth of his work. One can expect a fall season filled with events featuring his Superstars, art history scholars, and others interested in discerning how and why Warhol’s work was “clairvoyant” and “genius,” in the words of Peter Schjeldahl’s brilliant New Yorker review. New pieces of writing continue to emerge as well, including Catherine Johnson’s Thank You Andy Warhol and a piece called I Shop: Andy Warhol written by the playwright Robert Heide, who was friendly with the artist. In addition to this merited spotlight on Warhol’s impressive body of work, new art that is influenced by or directly references Pop and its great standard-bearer also points to fresh and innovative directions in the future of Pop.